Vaccines in the News

Vaccines in the News

Pediatricians: Colorado Immunization Information System is good for children, public health February 20, 2017
We were disappointed to read the opinion column about the Colorado Immunization Information System (CIIS) by Pam Long. Her column misrepresented CIIS, which provides an enormous benefit to Colorado’s families. Vaccines save many thousands of lives in the U.S. every year, and CIIS is a vital tool to maintain high immunization coverage and protect Colorado’s children from serious diseases. As pediatricians, we hope to set the record straight regarding the benefits that CIIS offers to Colorado families. [+] more
Offering HPV Vaccinations in Pharmacies Improves the Numbers, Reduces Future Cancers February 20, 2017
Pharmacists’ accessibility and interactions with the public may help increase HPV vaccine coverage. Pharmacies are open longer hours than most primary care provider offices and patients may receive a vaccination without an appointment. The journal Preventive Medicine features data in its February 2017 issue that suggest that a pharmacist-led HPV vaccine provision could increase vaccine coverage.
The study authors surveyed 1255 parents of American adolescents on their willingness to have a pharmacist vaccinate their children for HPV. Surveying personnel selected respondents through random-digit dialing of landlines and cell phones, and addressed sampling to capture homes without phones. The authors then assessed the results with a multivariable logistic regression.
The CDC has recommended routine vaccination of human papillomavirus (HPV) in all children ages 11 or 12 since 2011 with a goal of 80% coverage by 2020. However, uptake has been slow due to stigma associated with the sexual means of HPV transmission. Only 42% of girls and 28% of boys 13 to 17 years old received the three-dose series by the end of 2015. Pharmacists’ accessibility and interactions with the public may help increase HPV vaccine coverage. Pharmacies are open longer hours than most primary care provider offices and patients may receive a vaccination without an appointment. The journal Preventive Medicine features data in its February 2017 issue that suggest that a pharmacist-led HPV vaccine provision could increase vaccine coverage. [+] more
If you don’t vaccinate your kids, Australia won’t pay for your child care February 20, 2017
In Australia, there used to be widespread agreement that vaccinating children against fatal diseases was a good thing. Kids got shots, and the rate of childhood diseases plummeted.
But then things changed. In 1994, a group calling itself the Australian Vaccination Network launched a campaign claiming the risks of vaccines (which are essentially nonexistent). Its core mission: “to ensure that vaccinations are never made compulsory for Australian children.” (Years later, the group was forced to change its name to the Australian Vaccination-Skeptics Network, or else be de-registered.) The group seized on a fraudulent, wholly discredited paper linking the MMR vaccine to autism.
In Australia, there used to be widespread agreement that vaccinating children against fatal diseases was a good thing. Kids got shots, and the rate of childhood diseases plummeted. But then things changed. In 1994, a group calling itself the Australian Vaccination Network launched a campaign claiming the risks of vaccines (which are essentially nonexistent). Its core mission: “to ensure that vaccinations are never made compulsory for Australian children.” (Years later, the group was forced to change its name to the Australian Vaccination-Skeptics Network, or else be de-registered.) The group seized on a fraudulent, wholly discredited paper linking the MMR vaccine to autism. [+] more
Complacency is the enemy of vaccination February 13, 2017
Although  most medical institutions around the world agree on the safety and efficacy of approved vaccines, concerns regarding them remain. In researching her new book “The Vaccine Race: Science, Politics, and the Human Costs of Defeating Disease,” author Meredith Wadman delved into the sixties era quest to create a vaccine for rubella —  a seemingly benign virus that can lead to deadly fetal consequences when it appears  in pregnant women.
“There have definitely been vaccine accidents throughout the last hundred years that have not ended well for people who have been vaccinated,” she says. But she adds, “Today, we have much more stringent safeguards before any vaccine can be put in any population…. Patients [are] really more participants in the research process rather than objects of it.”
Although  most medical institutions around the world agree on the safety and efficacy of approved vaccines, concerns regarding them remain. In researching her new book “The Vaccine Race: Science, Politics, and the Human Costs of Defeating Disease,” author Meredith Wadman delved into the sixties era quest to create a vaccine for rubella —  a seemingly benign virus that can lead to deadly fetal consequences when it appears  in pregnant women. “There have definitely been vaccine accidents throughout the last hundred years that have not ended well for people who have been vaccinated,” she says. But she adds, “Today, we have much more stringent safeguards before any vaccine can be put in any population…. Patients [are] really more participants in the research process rather than objects of it.” [+] more
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