Vaccines in the News

Vaccines in the News

Flu shot saves children's lives, study shows April 3, 2017
The yearly flu shot could prevent most flu-related deaths among children and teenagers, a new U.S. government study estimates.
Researchers found that about three-quarters of U.S. kids who died of flu complications between 2010 and 2014 were unvaccinated before they fell ill.
The yearly flu shot could prevent most flu-related deaths among children and teenagers, a new U.S. government study estimates.

Researchers found that about three-quarters of U.S. kids who died of flu complications between 2010 and 2014 were unvaccinated before they fell ill. [+] more
Hepatitis Tied to Parkinson’s Risk April 3, 2017
Hepatitis infection may increase the risk for Parkinson’s disease, though the reasons for the link remain unknown.
British investigators used records of 100,390 patients hospitalized with various forms of hepatitis or H.I.V. from 1999 to 2011. They compared Parkinson’s incidence in these patients with incidence in more than six million people admitted for medical or surgical conditions like cataracts, knee replacement or varicose veins.
The study, in Neurology, found that people with hepatitis B had a 76 percent higher risk of having Parkinson’s, and people with hepatitis C a 51 percent higher risk, than the control group. Those with other forms of hepatitis or H.I.V. had no increased risk.
Hepatitis infection may increase the risk for Parkinson’s disease, though the reasons for the link remain unknown. British investigators used records of 100,390 patients hospitalized with various forms of hepatitis or H.I.V. from 1999 to 2011. They compared Parkinson’s incidence in these patients with incidence in more than six million people admitted for medical or surgical conditions like cataracts, knee replacement or varicose veins. The study, in Neurology, found that people with hepatitis B had a 76 percent higher risk of having Parkinson’s, and people with hepatitis C a 51 percent higher risk, than the control group. Those with other forms of hepatitis or H.I.V. had no increased risk. [+] more
As Cholera Spreads, Somalia Begins Vaccination Campaign March 27, 2017
Somalia, which has been hit by a series of crises that sound like a page from the Book of Job, is starting a major effort to vaccinate 450,000 people against its latest plague: cholera.
The country, in the Horn of Africa, has long suffered from weak central government, fighting among clan warlords and terrorist acts committed by Al Shabab, an Islamic militant group with some factions aligned with Al Qaeda.
In 1993, the capital, Mogadishu, was the scene of the “Black Hawk Down” battle between United States Army Rangers and clan militias. American troops sent to protect food aid shipments ended up fighting the warlords who were seizing them.
Somalia, which has been hit by a series of crises that sound like a page from the Book of Job, is starting a major effort to vaccinate 450,000 people against its latest plague: cholera. The country, in the Horn of Africa, has long suffered from weak central government, fighting among clan warlords and terrorist acts committed by Al Shabab, an Islamic militant group with some factions aligned with Al Qaeda. In 1993, the capital, Mogadishu, was the scene of the “Black Hawk Down” battle between United States Army Rangers and clan militias. American troops sent to protect food aid shipments ended up fighting the warlords who were seizing them. [+] more
Study: African-Americans don't trust flu vaccine; whites don't think flu is that bad March 25, 2017
Many African-Americans don't get flu shots because they don't trust the vaccine, while whites are more likely to think the flu is not a big deal, a new study has found.
The study, conducted in part by researchers from the Maryland Center for Health Equity at the University of Maryland, College Park, looked at racial disparities in flu vaccinations.
The researchers found African-Americans worried about the safety of the shot more than the health risks of the flu.
Many African-Americans don't get flu shots because they don't trust the vaccine, while whites are more likely to think the flu is not a big deal, a new study has found. The study, conducted in part by researchers from the Maryland Center for Health Equity at the University of Maryland, College Park, looked at racial disparities in flu vaccinations. The researchers found African-Americans worried about the safety of the shot more than the health risks of the flu. [+] more
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