Vaccines in the News

Vaccines in the News

Colorado's vaccination rate holding, but funding fight ahead February 26, 2017
DENVER (AP) — Colorado's ranking for childhood immunization rates is improving despite coverage levels staying relatively steady over the past decade and national surveys that often show it falling below average.
The state ranks 14th nationwide in immunizations, up from 36th in a previous ranking, according to a new study from Children's Hospital Colorado and the Colorado Children's Immunization Coalition.
Still, about one in four children lack needed immunizations at 36 months of age, the study found, and one of its authors says a looming funding fight could derail the state's standing.
DENVER (AP) — Colorado's ranking for childhood immunization rates is improving despite coverage levels staying relatively steady over the past decade and national surveys that often show it falling below average. The state ranks 14th nationwide in immunizations, up from 36th in a previous ranking, according to a new study from Children's Hospital Colorado and the Colorado Children's Immunization Coalition. Still, about one in four children lack needed immunizations at 36 months of age, the study found, and one of its authors says a looming funding fight could derail the state's standing. [+] more
Health briefs: Colorado reports increase in mumps cases February 26, 2017
Steamboat Springs — Colorado reports increase in mumps cases
#The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment is alerting parents and healthcare providers about an increase in mumps cases, currently focused in the Denver and Aurora areas. There has been a sizable increase in mumps cases, nationwide, with outbreaks reported in Arkansas, Oklahoma, Iowa, Washington and Illinois.
#Mumps is a viral infection that causes painful swelling of salivary glands, a low-grade fever and headache. Some people with mumps have no symptoms. Severe complications from mumps are rare but can include swelling of the brain, inflammation of the ovaries or testicles or deafness. People are advised to contact a healthcare provider if their child develops any swelling of the glands around the ears or neck.
The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment is alerting parents and healthcare providers about an increase in mumps cases, currently focused in the Denver and Aurora areas. There has been a sizable increase in mumps cases, nationwide, with outbreaks reported in Arkansas, Oklahoma, Iowa, Washington and Illinois. Mumps is a viral infection that causes painful swelling of salivary glands, a low-grade fever and headache. Some people with mumps have no symptoms. Severe complications from mumps are rare but can include swelling of the brain, inflammation of the ovaries or testicles or deafness. People are advised to contact a healthcare provider if their child develops any swelling of the glands around the ears or neck. [+] more
The Strange History of Vaccines—And Why People Fear Them February 26, 2017
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New malaria vaccine is fully effective in very small clinical trial February 25, 2017
Malaria, a potentially deadly mosquito-borne infection, remains a problem in many parts of the world. Reducing infections has been challenging because no vaccine is currently available. Prevention efforts have mostly concentrated on eliminating the transmission vector, mosquitoes. A recent study published in Nature shows that a new vaccine for malaria is well tolerated by humans and can provide significant immunity to malaria.
Malaria is caused by infection of the protozoan parasite Plasmodium falciparum. These are complex cells that have a number of means to evade the immune system, which has made the creation of vaccines challenging. To make this new vaccine, the parasites were first rendered harmless via radiation and then rapidly frozen for preservation. Healthy adult volunteers were given three doses of this vaccine at 28-day intervals before being challenged with exposure to the malaria parasite. Under these conditions, nine out of the nine immunized participants avoided a malaria infection.
Malaria, a potentially deadly mosquito-borne infection, remains a problem in many parts of the world. Reducing infections has been challenging because no vaccine is currently available. Prevention efforts have mostly concentrated on eliminating the transmission vector, mosquitoes. A recent study published in Nature shows that a new vaccine for malaria is well tolerated by humans and can provide significant immunity to malaria. Malaria is caused by infection of the protozoan parasite Plasmodium falciparum. These are complex cells that have a number of means to evade the immune system, which has made the creation of vaccines challenging. To make this new vaccine, the parasites were first rendered harmless via radiation and then rapidly frozen for preservation. Healthy adult volunteers were given three doses of this vaccine at 28-day intervals before being challenged with exposure to the malaria parasite. Under these conditions, nine out of the nine immunized participants avoided a malaria infection. [+] more
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